Maritime 
Index

Dover Harbour Board Tugs


 

The pictures on this page show some of the Dover Harbour Board tugs from the first half of the twentieth century.

These pictures, along with several others on this site, are part of a family collection, now in the custody of Mr. David Dixon.


The Lady Curzon on the slipway in the Wellington Basin.

My grandfather joined this vessel as a boy in December 1904.  His uncle, Albert Sharp, was Master.



The Lady Crundall on the slipway in the Wellington Basin.

 


Captain William George Sharp

My great grandfather, Captain William George Sharp, served on these vessels for 58 years.  My grandfather, also William George, served on the tugs all his working life.

 


 

 

 

 

Lady Crundall

My grandfather was an Ordinary Seaman when he joined her first crew at the South Shields shipyard in November 1906.  His wages at that time were 15s. per week.


Lady Duncannon, Lady Crundall and Lady Brassey

The Lady Brassey was launched in 1913.  My grandfather joined her crew in October 1913 at the age of 25.  He also served on her sister ship, Lady Duncannon.  I remember both of these vessels as a boy in the 1950s, moored alongside the Prince of Wales Pier.  It was a sad day when they were replaced in 1958 by the small, modern, diesel-powered vessels, Diligent and Dominant.  These in turn were replaced by the Deft and the Dextrous in 1983.


The Lady Vita

My grandfather joined the crew of the Lady Vita on Christmas Eve 1907 at the princely wage of 1.2s.6d. per week.

 


The Lady Curzon is seen here accompanying Heaton on his Channel swim.

E. Heaton made 6 attempts to swim the Channel between 1905 and 1910, but failed each time.


Lady Crundall with the Prince of Wales Pier behind.

I believe that the skipper on the bridge is my great grandfather.  When my grandfather re-joined her crew as an Able Seaman in March 1910, his wages had increased to 1.5s.0d.

 


Captain Sharp on the bridge of one of the tugs alongside the Prince of Wales Pier


Unidentified vessel receiving assistance from two of the DHB tugs, possibly the Lady Vita and Lady Curzon.  Can anybody throw some light on this picture?

Last updated 24 March 2008